Random Links, Early in the Morning

Sep. 19th, 2017 05:55 am
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[personal profile] dewline
On fictional user interface design for film and TV:

http://www.idnworld.com/imprints/FUI-DesignFilmGames

On Brexit's campaign against anti-corruption efforts (and yes, I wrote that as intended):

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/19/opinion/brexit-britain-corruption.html
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[personal profile] doc_paradise
 

Title: When Good Men Behave Badly: Change Your Behaviour, Change Your Relationships

Author: David B. Wexler, Ph.D.

ISBN: ISBN-13 978-1-57224-346-0

Type: Fixer

 

Summary: 

“When Good Men Behave Badly” focuses on men’s feelings of helplessness, powerlessness, and perceived threats to identity that can lead to acting badly in otherwise good men with good values, who want to make good choices instead of being emotionally hijacked by their limbic system. It offers these men acknowledgement and an understanding of their emotional life with the goal of equipping them with new behavioural options.

CONTENT WARNING: This book contains examples of domestic violence and examples of derogatory language

 

Presentation Style

This is a self-help book for middle-aged, white, cis-men written by a middle-aged, white, cis-man. On the one hand, this framing is useful because this to create a tone of (white) men talking to (white) men about shared experiences which may be difficult for women (and others) to have sympathy for when they are on the receiving end of the described bad behaviour. On the other hand, the advice is very binary oriented (men and women only), heteronormative (heterosexual and monogamous assumptions), and doesn’t discern between different groups of men (one size fits all *sigh*). It doesn’t specifically state that it is about white men, but with a white man on the cover… it doesn’t do anything to move away from white men as the default. I’m agender, I don’t exist in this book.

Speaking of the cover… I hate it. My edition has a white man in a dress shirt holding flowers behind his back. My mind jumps to the assumption that the man is in the “doghouse”. A focus group somewhere may have determined that this is brilliant marketing, but it makes me cringe. The irony of the cover is that the book warns of the importance of perception by telling the story of one of the author’s clients, who had a great session with him, but never returned to therapy after the author recommended a book that had the phrase “verbal abuse” in the title.[1]

“When Good Men Behave Badly” is a relatively short book (199 pages + references) that overviews and introduces a selection of ideas, explanations, exercises, and suggestions. It uses examples heavily (see content warning) and fiction examples which may be dated (I don’t recognize most of them, but that didn’t make much of a difference to understanding). This is introductory material. If you want to go into the topics in depth you will have to follow up with other material [2] or seek out a therapist familiar with men’s issues.

 

Chapter Breakdown:

1. Good Men and Broken Mirrors — Introduces mirroring, broken mirrors, and twinning through the concept of selfobjects (someone or something that helps us feel cohesive). How the broken mirror experience can trigger acting out. 

2. The Power of Women — What men are taught [by toxic masculinity] to expect from women and how emotional dependancy on women for missing needs can lead to resentment or withdrawal, and a perception that they have power over men.

3. Fathers and Sons: Curses and Blessings — How fathers may expect sons to be positive mirrors, react to them as broken mirrors when they don’t measure up, and what this does to boys. 

4. Midlife, Affairs, and Projections —What people do when there is a gap between what is and what they expected in their life. This talks about self-awareness, distress tolerance, taking responsibility and how these can help when it feels like something is missing.

5.  Men’s Brains —What it is like to be hijacked by your limbic system and the effects of anger. Some strategies for dealing with these.

6. Odysseus, Relational Heroism, and Imaginary Crimes — How to be a Relational Hero through self-awareness, preparation, and doing things differently. How to let go of Imaginary Crimes.

7. Guy Talk —How men talk to themselves and other men, and how that sets the frame for behaviour.

8. What Women Can Do —For those women who read the book, a short chapter on dealing with men (and raising boys) within the context of the author’s “good men” hypothesis with some concrete “try these” ideas. It also recognizes that there are men who are dangerous and not just behaving badly.

 

My Opinion:

This is a book about how toxic masculinity fucks over men.

 

“When Good Men Behave Badly” presents itself mainly as a relationship repair guide, but it is more about how men can have better relationships with themselves through self-awareness, emotional regulation, and understanding the influences of masculinity in themselves… improved romantic and family relationships is a (very positive) side-effect of being able to navigate one’s internal landscape without being capsized or swamped. I think it is important to healing and growth that men have acknowledgement of their feelings of helplessness, powerlessness, and missing needs, and I like that this book acknowledges this as something that women do for men while at the same time pointing out that disowning responsibility for those needs ultimately undermines the ability to get them met. I like that the author manages to navigate recognizing the subjective reality of these feelings while disassembling the idea that it is women’s job (and men are helpless) to emotionally regulate men. The author strongly believes in men’s positive ability to learn how to regulate and manage their emotional needs well. 

 

That said, as an agender person who is regularly misgendered as a woman, I’m struggling to find a way to get this book into the hands of the men I think who would benefit from it (possibly even enjoy it), without giving the impression that I think they are broken and harmful people. The book goes in a much different direction than that, but that doesn’t matter if first impressions means they don’t get past the cover.[3] Even beyond the usual problems with giving self-help books to people[4], I think it may be especially difficult, due to the topic, for a woman to give this book to a man without it being potentially perceived (accurately or inaccurately) as shaming. That is unfortunate.   

 

I think, therefore, that this is a book for men to read and then share with other men in an act of twinship mirroring. 

 

-------------------------------

Footnotes:

[1] One of Wexler’s areas of specialty is domestic abuse. He has a number of other books on the topic as well as a book about men in therapy, which (according to the blurb I read) apparently does deal with groups of men other than white cis-men. 

 

[2] Such as the work of Terrence Real (author of “I Don’t Want To Talk About It” a book on male depression) which is quoted and referenced in this book. 

 

[3] Being known as someone who reads a staggering number of self-help/psychology books does help diffuse this “I’m giving this to you because you’re broken” vibe, but still… “Hey! I found this fabulous book on [insert taboo topic here] that I think you will love and get lots out of!” isn’t a great party topic for most people. My friends have figured out how to run with it, but they are also used to seeing books on conflict or trauma (for example) on my coffee table.

 

[4] Self-help books don’t make good gifts folks. They are specifically aimed at fixing people and giving them will *always* have an underlying message that needs to be managed. I love self-help books but there are books on my shelf that just sit there unread specifically because of the framing of their gifting. 

 

Disclaimer: I am not a therapist, a doctor, or a professional reviewer. I do, however, own and enjoy reading a staggering number of self-help books and I have opinions. Lots of opinions. One of these opinions is that the underlying assumptions in “self-improvement” and “self-help” books should be unpacked. These reviews may or may not do that, but I will try to acknowledge both some of the potentially useful and potentially problematic aspects of the books I review. 

Discovery: In Case You Wondered

Sep. 18th, 2017 09:42 pm
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[personal profile] dewline
Since the series is going to air on Space Channel here in Canada - thank the Great Bird, the Prophets, the Grand Material Continuum, Surak and Kahless for that! - I do plan to watch the series. I do not like this "streaming-subscription" business model.

Noting the first four episode titles per trekmovie.com:
  • The Vulcan Hello
  • Battle at the Binary Stars
  • Context is for Kings
  • The Butcher's Knife Cares Not for the Lamb's Cry


Some attention-getters as episode titles go, yes?
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[personal profile] full_metal_ox posting in [community profile] metaquotes
[personal profile] sasha_honeypalm's musical tribute to Barbara G. Walker's (professionally published!) novel
Amazon:


Don't know much about history
Don't know much about theology
Don't know much 'bout how to write a book
Don't know how to cite the quotes I took
But I know all that I say must be true
And I know if you believed it, too
What a wonderful world this would be

Don't know much about geography
Don't know much sociology
Don't know how to understand folklore
Don't know what a reference book is for
But I do know that one god is bad
And if we'd kept the goddess we once had
What a wonderful world this would be

Now, I don't claim to be a goddess
But I'm tryin' to be
For maybe if I'm a goddess, people
You'll all worship me.

Don't know much about history
Don't know much about technology
Don't know much...


[personal profile] rosepsyche's paean to the Power of Story is also quoteworthy:

I have to call "bull" on Antiope's reasoning that art and music are inferior because they are "not alive" for another reason. No, such creations aren't living, breathing things. However (and I apologize if this gets a bit corny), the best of them can seem as if they are alive, get us invested in their characters, have us cheering about their triumphs and crying over their tragedies. They are just as valuable in their own way for their ability to entertain, to inspire, to teach, to help us grow and develop by seeing the world from a new point of view, and I don't think anyone involved in creating them would appreciate being told that their work can never compare to something that was squeezed out of a vagina.


Context sporks the world's worst Wonder Woman fanfic.

Closing Out the Weekend

Sep. 17th, 2017 09:53 pm
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[personal profile] dewline
Still. Not. Normal.
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[personal profile] dewline
I rewatched Atomic Blonde on Friday night. It made a bit more sense on the second viewing, which was good. It's not only a whodunnit, but a how- and why- as well as being a period spy/action drama. Not sure that we need a sequel to it, but that's an argument we can have in the comments.

Constellations

Sep. 17th, 2017 05:33 pm
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[personal profile] alexxkay
Kestrell and I went to see Constellations at the Central Square Theater. I quite liked it; Kestrell hated it. Which, to my mind, makes it worth talking about.

The play has only two actors, each of them on stage throughout. They both get to show off their acting chops as almost every scene is repeated multiple times, with slight but significant variations. It’s a bit like Groundhog Day, but none of the characters are aware of what’s going on, it’s merely the audience observing different forks of a branching multiverse. I’ve seen Marianna Bassham in a number of local plays over the years, and gotten to be rather a fan; I thought she was brilliant in this.

Interestingly, one scene was almost entirely in sign language. I’m not sure if it’s more or less funny if you as an audience member don’t understand sign. By the end of the scene, at any rate, I found the communication to be quite effective.

The set is abstract but gorgeous. The floor and (tilted) ceiling are mirrors reflecting the action (which of course reflects itself). The back of the stage is a dark but translucent curtain, behind which are an array of light bulbs of varying sizes and colors; stars in a night sky, lights of a ballroom floor, points of significance slowly dying…

The ads for the play say that it is “about love, possibility, bees, and… quantum physics”. This is true, as far as it goes. It is perhaps more difficult to fill seats with such phrases as “fatal brain cancer”* and “coping with a meaningless universe.” I found the ending bittersweet in a manner reminiscent of Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia; Kestrell found it nothing but bleak. Obviously, mileage varies. Hopefully, this random assortment of reactions will give you some idea whether or not you want to go see it. It runs through October 8.

* This play is likely to evoke strong feelings in those who knew Caleb Hanson, especially in his final months.

[sci hist] A Most Remarkable Week

Sep. 17th, 2017 12:52 am
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[personal profile] siderea
(h/t Metafilter)

This link should take you to the audio player for The Moth, cued to a story, "Who Can You Trust", 12 minutes long.

The Moth, if you didn't know, is an organization that supports storytelling – solo spoken word prose – true stories. This story is told by Dr. Mary-Clare King, the discoverer of BRC1. It concerns a most extraordinary week in her life, when pretty much everything went absurdly wrong and right at all once. It is by turns appalling and amazing and touching and throughout hilarious.

It's worth hearing her tell herself before the live audience. But if you prefer transcript, that's here – but even the link is a spoiler.

Recommended.

incremental progress

Sep. 15th, 2017 12:08 pm
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[personal profile] kareila
We didn't get any bad weather here from Irma, just a pleasant temperature drop and two school-free days. The worst impact from the storm among people I know who were affected seems to be the extended power outages.

Will made the Scholar's Bowl team at school, and practices start next Tuesday. I don't expect to hear anything about Math Team until October, but those practices have been on Wednesdays, so he shouldn't have a problem doing both.

Connor's after school Spanish class isn't meeting this year because not enough students enrolled. I've found an alternate activity for him on Wednesdays, some sort of board game club, but it only meets twice every six weeks. He has a field trip next week to some sort of environmental preserve, so I signed up as a chaperone in order to tag along and investigate.

Symphony chorus rehearsals start back Monday. Sadly we are no longer scheduled to participate in the Harry Potter soundtrack performance, but we do have the tribute piece and the Bach Magnificat to look forward to learning.

I've just acquired some of the latest LEGO Dimensions expansions, although I had to go to my local Best Buy to find them - surprisingly, Amazon hasn't stocked them. I'm hearing rumors that LEGO is going to quietly stop releasing new expansions, which is too bad, but I can understand why if the game wasn't successful enough to justify the continued expense of developing new content. And the update process is still very frustrating - my console has been trying to download and install the latest updates for over an hour now, and I had to free up system storage again before it would even get started.

I need to sign off now - I have a meeting in 45 minutes with one of Will's teachers and I haven't eaten anything yet.
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[personal profile] spikedluv posting in [site community profile] dw_community_promo

(Credit: multi-screencap)

We may not get more Jude | Zero | Zude in canon, but that doesn’t mean we can’t get them in our fic/art/vids! This round of Team Zude Comment!Fic & Art Fest is for virtual season four-related prompts where Jude and Zero are both still on the show.

Leave a prompt in comments to this post at [community profile] team_zude. If you find a prompt that you like, go ahead and fill it!

The Fest will run for ~6 weeks, beginning today, Friday, September 15th, and running through midnight Tuesday, October 31st. See the post linked above for more information.
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[personal profile] siderea
I have a recollection of hearing a filk song, I think from a tape, that had a climactic line or repeated like in the refrain, to the effect of "And that's what cities get from trains". I have an impression it was a Leslie Fish song, but I don't know that for sure.

Not having any joy of google. Does anybody recognize it?

Outlander Forum!

Sep. 13th, 2017 08:59 am
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[personal profile] jo posting in [site community profile] dw_community_promo
Now that season 3 is underway, come join us at [community profile] outlander_forum , a discussion community for fans of the Starz TV adaptation and/or Diana Gabaldon's books. We've already got a discussion of episode 301 underway, so come and join in!!



[personal profile] pink_halen on eggs and cages

Sep. 12th, 2017 11:01 am
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[personal profile] conuly posting in [community profile] metaquotes
It seems that Starbucks is offering sandwiches with Cage Free Egg Whites. Personally, I never keep my egg whites in cages. Usually keeping them in their shells works just fine.

Context is free-range.
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[personal profile] siderea
(h/t Metafilter)

I just heard about Senior House. Goddamn.

Also. I hadn't realized that dealing with the administration in his capacity as Senior House's housemaster is what drove Henry Jenkins from MIT. Goddamn.

I am surprisingly angry and sad about this, given that I'm not a SH affiliate.

The shutdown of Senior House would be bad news, by itself. This is appalling:
The questionnaire, the Healthy Minds Survey, was administered by the University of Michigan. Many schools around the country give it to students as a way to pinpoint problems on campus and decide how best to allocate resources. When MIT administered it in 2015, they told students that it was a confidential survey intended to help them. One of the chancellor’s assistants who had lived in Senior House when she was an undergraduate went to Senior House and specifically requested that the residents take it. They did, in large numbers.

What they didn’t know—and what they couldn’t have known from reading the consent form that accompanied it—was that MIT had embedded metadata that allowed the administration to pinpoint the location of those filling out the questionnaire, enabling them to segment the results by dorm. The only question about dorm type in the survey was vague—“What kind of dorm do you live in? Small, large, off campus?”—but by tracking the metadata, Barnhart and the administration were able to see exactly where respondents lived.

It was this data that enabled Barnhart to see what she called a troubling hot spot of drug use. “If it wasn’t a direct violation, it was at least a violation of the spirit of informed consent,” Johnson says.
In light of that...
As Senior House students spread out across campus this year, former advisers worry that they’ll be at even greater risk. They can reach out to MIT’s mental health services if they need it, the chancellor says.
Is there some reason that MIT students should trust MIT Med to keep their information confidential? When MIT just used the confidential results of a "Healthy Minds Survey", which was advertised as a way of seeing where resources were needed, to eliminate resources from vulnerable populations? And the relevant IRB gave it a pass?

(Dear MIT students, and alums concerned about them: it is apparently hypothetically possible for students on the default MIT student health insurance ("extended" plan) to see therapists unaffiliated with MIT, but it has a pretty punative copay:
If you are covered by the MIT Student Extended Plan, and you see a mental health clinician who participates in the Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) PPO, your first 12 visits in a calendar year are covered in full (100%). After that, you will have a $25 copay for each visit.

If you are covered by the MIT Student Extended Plan, and you see a mental health clinician who does NOT participate in the Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) PPO, your first 12 visits in a calendar year are covered at 100 percent of the BCBS allowed amount. After that, your insurance will cover 80 percent of the allowed amount, and you will pay the other 20 percent. For all of your visits, your clinician may bill you for the difference between the BCBS allowed amount and his or her charges. This is something you should discuss with your clinician ahead of time.
I don't know for certain what BCBS's "allowed amount" is, but I know they're paying master's level therapists about $85 per therapy session, so I'm guessing that's it. So if a therapist's regular fee is $100, you'd be paying ($85*0.2)+($100-$85)=$32 per session. A lot of therapists are charging rather more that $100/session these days. At $120/session that's $52/session.

That copay/cost-sharing is absurd. Obviously, many students couldn't possibly afford $25/week copay – specially the most vulnerable ones. So that's a hell of an incentive to seek care from MIT Mental Health and Counseling Service directly: as they proudly state, no copay or other fees to see the therapists that work for MIT.

Less obviously, it's not even vaguely in line with the market right now. I see people who have jobs and pay $10 and $15 copays on other insurances. That students would be charged a $25 copay to see a therapist – in-network! – is incredible. Honestly, students being charged any copay is pretty out of line.

Seriously: MIT students, the people who stock the shelves in the Star Market behind Random have better access to mental health care than you do. That grocery store shelf stocker qualifies for a subsidized Medicaid Expansion plan, which covers at least a therapy session per week, with no copay. Also, their plan has hundreds, if not thousands, of therapists to choose from, none of whom report to your landlord cum diploma-granter-maybe cum civil authority cum boss of your local police.

Also, availing yourself of the option of seeing a non-MIT therapist on your MIT student insurance, even though it's through BCBS, requires a "referral" from MIT Med:
If you are already seeing an outside clinician or have a specific outside clinician in mind, you don’t have to make an appointment at MIT Medical to get a referral. Just call the Mental Health and Counseling Service at 617-253-2916, and ask to speak with someone about getting a referral for your outside treatment.
This may be completely pro forma, but the upshot is that MIT is making it a requirement on you that you notify MIT if you're getting psychotherapy, and that you divulge to them from from whom you are getting it. That someone is in therapy and from whom they get that therapy is highly confidential information, that frankly MIT has no business knowing. You should be able to see a therapist on your student insurance without MIT even knowing about it.

So if you wanted to work for the benefit of students' mental health, there's a great target: demand that MIT's insurance for students provides off-campus, unaffiliated psychotherapy with no copay, cost sharing, or balance billing – or radically less than at present, so MIT students can freely avail themselves of treaters not on MIT payroll; and abolish the need for a referral, because info about your utilization of mental health care is prejudicial, privileged information that can be used against you. But be careful to keep a third-party insurance co in the loop, instead of MIT directly paying therapists; whomever pays the therapist is allowed to snoop in your psychotherapy records.

Or, honestly, given some of the crappy-ass general health care friends of mine have gotten through the Med Center, maybe just agitate for all students to just get a regular BCBS PPO membership instead of having to go to the Med Center, at all. Or given how much BCBS sucks, try to get students into the Medicaid Expansion, so students get a choice of providers. That would be harder.

P.S. Disclosure of conflicts of interest: none – I don't take BCBS, so even if the copay/cost-share/balance-billing were eliminated, and students started flocking to off-campus therapists, I still wouldn't benefit by any of that business, unless somehow you managed to get students into Medicaid Expansion, and then only if students were willing to travel all the way to Medford to see me – I just have it in for MIT Med, and MIT MHCS especially.)
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[personal profile] siderea
I now have enough levels in crockpottery to recognize that this recipe, "Chicken Leek and Mushroom Casserole", is absurd as written. For one thing, there's absolutely no reason to include any chicken stock at all, unless one wants a soup as a result, given how much fluid 8 chicken thighs will express; given how much fluid winds up in it, there's no way it would ever come out "creamy", or, for that matter, at all like a "casserole". Yeah, I bet you have to thicken the sauce with cornstarch (ew).

But I really wanted a slowcooker meat dish with leeks, and I wasn't finding much, so I decided to adjust for sanity, double it (because I consider 8 servings a bare minimum for the effort), and give it whirl.

Also, I added canned potatoes to obviate later having to come up with a starch to serve it with.

Results seem pretty good! [personal profile] tn3270 seems very taken with it.

Here's my version:

4.5 lbs of chicken thighs, boneless skinless (could handle another lb)
3 cans (~15oz) whole potatoes
2 leeks (the biggest diameter ones on sale), washed really well and sliced
1 lb sliced button mushrooms
4 tsp minced garlic
4 Tbsp butter
2 tsp thyme
2 tsp rosemary
4 bay leaves
3 Tbsp mustard, dijon
1/2 C cream, heavy
2 Tbsp lemon juice
salt and pepper at the table
slowcooker liner

uses 6qt slowcooker and 4 cup frying pan with lid

0) Melt butter in big frying pan. Sauté the leeks in the butter until they start to soften. Push to sides and add minced garlic; saute abt 90 seconds to golden brown, then mix in with leeks. Add mushrooms, stir a bit to get mushrooms coated with butter, then cover. Cook, stirring occasionally, till leeks are soft and their scent mellows. (Once this is done, this can be refrigerated, if you want to prep this in advance.)

1) Measure the herbs into a mixing bowl. Add mustard, cream, and lemon juice, mix. (This can also be refrigerated, if you want to prep this in advance.

2) Line slowcooker. Open and drain the potatoes, and put in bottom of slowcooker. Put in half the chicken, half the leek-mushroom mixture, the other half the chicken, and the other half the leek-mushroom mixture. Pour the mustard-cream sauce over it.

3) Cook on LOW for 6 to 8 hours. Remove bay leaves before eating.

ETA: Outstanding mysteries:

1) Is powdered rosemary just not a thing? Little rosemary bits isn't the same thing.

2) How much leek is "one leek"? When I got to the store, I had my choice of: a leek the diameter of my wrist, a leek about 2/3s the diameter of that, and lots of leeks the diameter of my two thumbs put together. The original recipe called for "one leek", and I'm like, "What does that even mean in this context?"

3) Is frozen pre-chopped leeks a thing? I love leeks, I do not love chopping leeks. I don't hate it – at least, being cylinders, they're much easier to chop than onions – but there's something to be said for convenience.

4) Even without the added two cups of fluid, it came out with a thin broth. Maybe next time thicken with tapioca. Or maybe reserve the cream for the end, and only add it in the last half hour? Slow cooking cream just seems to break it down.

RIP Len Wein 1948-2017

Sep. 10th, 2017 05:24 pm
dewline: (Grief)
[personal profile] dewline
I've just seen word on Facebook from Elliot S! Maggin and Paul Kupperberg. We've lost Len Wein today.

Details as we're able to get them...

[personal profile] ivy is a stranger in a strange land

Sep. 10th, 2017 05:45 pm
rydra_wong: dreamsheep with spork and "SheepSpork" logo; no, it wouldn't make any more sense if you saw it  (dreamwidth -- sheepspork)
[personal profile] rydra_wong posting in [community profile] metaquotes
Everyone was nice to me, but I found it hard to participate in some of the conversations because everyone else there was fluent in Gearhead and I just don't care. It was all

One dude: "How do you like that model BLQ45Z?"
Other dude: "It's got pretty good flang, but the chimping bleederweep doesn't zerbert as well as I like in the corners."
First dude: "I heard that floppykush helps with the zerberting, tried that?"
Third dude: "My next squelch is gonna be a floppykush! Used to have a panpan bleederweep, but you know what they say about those oilsquirms!"
All dudes: [nod sagely and then argue]


Context is locked; QWP.

My eyes still have me...

Sep. 10th, 2017 07:48 am
dewline: (compliment)
[personal profile] dewline
Had an exam at the Eye Institute on Friday. The specialist handling my file pronounced my situation "rock stable" and recommended that we do this again in about six months. I am more than happy to go along with this suggestion.
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[personal profile] siderea
0.

So there's this thing called, "GiveAnHour.org". It's (I have recently learned) a non-profit organization which exists to convince psychotherapists to provide pro-bono treatment to servicemembers and military family members.

Now, there's a number of reasons one might raise an eyebrow at this, but lets set that aside to grant at least for now that this is an attempt to address a legitimate need through legitimate means.

The way it usually functions is that volunteer therapists sign up, the org checks their bona fides to make sure they're in proper license status to work in their jurisdiction, and then the therpist get listed in their geographically-based directory that clients can use to find pro-bono therapists.

Well, apparently, they are moved by the plight of Houston to start a Hurricane Harvey relief project. I know about this because my national professional organization, AMHCA, just posted about it on our extranet. Leadership exhorted us to go sign up as volunteers, because GiveAnHour is expresssly and exclusively recruiting licensed mental health professionals as volunteers to provide remote care to people impacted by Hurricane Harvey.

I'm a little perplexed as to how this could work. Texas, as big as it is, does not hold a majority of mental health counselors in our professional org. What with there being 50 states and some-odd other jurisdictions, the vast majority of us AMHCA members are licensed someplace not Texas. We are licensed in our home states (plus a few over-achievers who have multiple state licenses for reasons).

It's not legal – AFAIK – for CMHCs who are not licensed by Texas to practice in Texas. Duh.

This is, in fact, the classic problem with CMHCs being volunteer professional responders to catastrophes. We're not allowed to cross state lines to help. Or rather, we can, but we have to not practice when we get there.

And, yes, we've thought of that: we have to be licensed where the client is, so, no, telecommuting to the disaster doesn't help.

(I have no idea how other medical professions handle this, or if they do.)

So I go poking at the GiveAnHour.org site to see what's up with their Hurricane Harvey volunteer therapist project.

Read more. This and two other eyerollers. )

this week in Do All The Things

Sep. 8th, 2017 11:13 am
kareila: drawing of a cute red house (house)
[personal profile] kareila
Sunday: conduct choir for church anthem because Fearless Leader is on forced bed rest for sciatic nerve pain

Also Sunday: drive to uncle's lake house! No one was in the mood to swim, but we took Connor on his first boat ride. He hated it for the first 10 minutes and then LOVED it after that. Invited to stay overnight, but had to return home so that Robby could do a Scheduled Work Thing.

Monday: Mom asks to come over for lunch and share leftovers from lake gathering. Then she takes the kids so Robby and I can go choose the new dishwasher his parents have been wanting to buy for us. Dishwasher is chosen, but will not be available for pickup for another 2.5 weeks. While at the mall, I check the LEGO Store and buy their last Apollo Saturn V Rocket set, because it is my destiny birthright lucky day

Also Monday: Red Sox play a 19 inning game against Toronto. I conk out on the couch after about 13 innings.

Tuesday: kids back in school, Robby back at work. My morning walk is up to 2 miles, about 2/3 of what I need for a 5K. I have a much needed chiropractor appointment and spend the afternoon finishing a book, then cleaning the living room (so that I can assemble the aforementioned LEGO set), then conking out on the couch again. After Robby gets home from work, I have to go to an overdue parent meeting at Connor's school, which is less informative than usual. Most of the other parents are focused on planning for the DC trip in the spring, which I've already decided to skip.

Wednesday: Robby takes the day off work to go car shopping. I have to take Will to school early to audition for the Scholar's Bowl team before classes start. Instead of returning home, I go to Panera for breakfast (free bagel!) and buy the kids some new shirts at Target, then check in with Robby, who took a test drive of a Subaru he saw advertised on Craigslist the night before. That car didn't work out, but he has another lead to check out at a dealership downtown. I have a 9:00 dental cleaning followed by a Genius Bar appointment at the Apple Store to see why Connor's iPad is having trouble charging. (Answer: inconclusive. Hardware checked out fine, told to upgrade to iOS 10, which does seem to have helped at least somewhat.) After that, I meet my mom for our usual Wednesday lunch date, interrupted by texts from Robby telling me how much he loves the second Subaru (a 2011 Outback) and asking for advice about financing. We realize he doesn't have the checkbook since he wasn't expecting to buy it on the spot, so I say goodbye to Mom and drive downtown to bring him a check for the down payment. YAY CAR.

Also Wednesday: we have church choir rehearsal in the evening and Will has a writing assignment that keeps him up past his bedtime. I'm not a fan of middle school teachers using Google Classroom to assign homework that is due at midnight on a school night. Thankfully, Will was able to finish by 10pm. I also somehow managed to do three loads of laundry before dinner time.

Thursday: After putting the kids on the school bus, I immediately drive to my in-laws' house so Robby can return the borrowed car he's been driving for the past month, then drive him downtown in rush hour traffic to retrieve the new Subaru, then drive to the Toyota dealership for the 25k maintenance on my car, which thankfully doesn't take long, so I'm done by 10:00. Then I run a bunch of other quick errands, returning home around lunch time. While Robby is waiting on our insurance agent to send him a proof of insurance, I get a phone call saying I have books waiting to be picked up at the library, which is near the registration office, so we decide to combine errands, leaving together around 1:45. Unfortunately there is a long wait and by the time Robby is finally finished an hour later, we have to rush home to meet Connor's 3:00 bus. Once the kids are settled, I decide I'm toast and am going to lie down the rest of the day. I do turn on the TV to watch the Pats game, more out of idle curiosity than any sort of enthusiasm, and fall asleep sometime during the fourth quarter, on the couch, again. I don't think I've slept in my bed since Sunday. The one night I tried, Robby got paged at some ungodly hour and I couldn't get back to sleep.

Which brings us to today! And now that I am finished chronicling the week's adventures, I am going to find lunch and read a book and when the kids get home it will be LEGO TIME.

January 2010

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