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Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes - US News and World Report

A recent Australian study noted that increased consumption of coffee and tea, with or without caffeine, correlated with a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Earlier studies had linked coffee consumption to decreased risk of prostate cancer, liver disease, stroke, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's disease. Unlike previous studies, however, this one discovered that the health benefits of coffee and tea include decaffeinated versions.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-12-15 12:34 pm (UTC)
From: [personal profile] nightprincess
http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/169/22/2053

Every time I see these sensationalistic food studies, I wish I could get more information. Do iced coffee and iced tea work too? How about hot water? Not that it'd be easy to find subjects who are willing to drink four cups of plain hot water per day for the length of the study, but maybe risk of diabetes is reduced because the liquid fills the stomach, and the temperature of the liquid prevent most people from drinking it very quickly. There are so many variables. How are they coming up with these conclusions?

(no subject)

Date: 2009-12-18 12:22 am (UTC)
From: [personal profile] nightprincess
It's good to know that some of it is acknowledged as just speculation. The way things are reported to the public, it does seem to me that science is very drastically broken. I wonder if the Renaissance artisan scientists would've come up with everything they did if they were tied down with a "publish or perish" mentality. In the area of nutrition especially, there seem to be a lot of propagated half-truths that seem more destructive than simply acknowledging "I have no idea why, but this correlation is potentially interesting."

(no subject)

Date: 2009-12-18 12:30 am (UTC)
From: [personal profile] nightprincess
I'm still not sure I understand how they have a "small-study bias". The abstract seems to suggest that they had data from "457,922 participants"? How much data do they need for something to not be a small study?

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